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Australia
Free Trade Agreement


The United States-Australia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) entered into force on January 1, 2005.  U.S. two-way trade with Australia was $26.7 billion in 2009, up 23 percent from 2004. U.S. goods exports were $18.9 billion in 2009, up 33 percent from 2004, and U.S. goods imports were $7.8 billion, up 3.5 percent from 2004. 

Bahrain
Free Trade Agreement

 
The United States-Bahrain FTA, which entered into force on January 11, 2006, generates export opportunities for the United States, creating jobs for U.S. farmers and workers.  The agreement also supports Bahrain’s economic and political reforms and enhances commercial relations with an economic leader in the Arabian Gulf.  On the first day the agreement took effect, 100 percent of the two-way trade in industrial and consumer products began to flow without tariffs. 

Because of the FTA, U.S. farmers have significantly increased their agricultural exports to Bahrain.  In addition, Bahrain opened its services market wider than any previous FTA partner, creating important new opportunities for U.S. financial service providers and companies that offer telecommunications, audiovisual, express delivery, distribution, healthcare, architecture, and engineering services.

Central America - Free Trade Agreement
Costa Rica
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Nicaragua


 
On August 5, 2004, the United States signed the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) with five Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua) and the Dominican Republic. 

Central America and the Dominican Republic represent the third largest U.S. export market in Latin America, behind Mexico and Brazil.  U.S. exports to the CAFTA-DR countries were valued at $19.5 billion in 2009. Combined total two-way trade in 2009 between the United States and Central America and the Dominican Republic was $37.9 billion

The agreement entered into force for the United States and El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua during 2006, for the Dominican Republic on March 1, 2007, and for Costa Rica on January 1, 2009. With the addition of Costa Rica, the CAFTA-DR is in force for all seven countries that signed the agreement.


Chile
Free Trade Agreement


The United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement (FTA) entered into force on January 1, 2004.

The United States-Chile FTA eliminates tariffs and opens markets, reduces barriers for trade in services, provides protection for intellectual property, ensures regulatory transparency, guarantees non-discrimination in the trade of digital products, commits the Parties to maintain competition laws that prohibit anticompetitive business conduct, and requires effective labor and environmental enforcement. In 2009, U.S. exports to Chile decreased by 26 percent to $8.8 billion, while U.S. imports from Chile decreased by 29 percent to $5.8 billion. 

Colombia
Free Trade Agreement - Pending US Congressional Approval


The United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement, sometimes called the Colombia Free Trade Agreement or FTA, was signed on November 22, 2006.

The Colombia FTA is a comprehensive free trade agreement.  When the Colombia FTA enters into force, Colombia will immediately eliminate most of its tariffs on U.S. exports, with all remaining tariffs phased out over defined time periods.

The Colombia FTA also includes important disciplines relating to customs administration and trade facilitation, technical barriers to trade, government procurement, investment, telecommunications, electronic commerce, intellectual property rights, and labor and environmental protection.

Colombia's Congress approved the agreement and a protocol of amendment in 2007.  Colombia's Constitutional Court completed its review in July 2008, and concluded that the Agreement conforms to Colombia's Constitution. President Obama tasked the U.S. Trade Representative with seeking a path to address outstanding issues surrounding the Colombia FTA. Status Pending Congressional Approval.


Israel
Free Trade Agreement


This year, 2010, marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the United States-Israel Free Trade Agreement, which was the first FTA entered into by the United States.  It continues to serve as the foundation for expanding trade and investment between the United States and Israel by reducing barriers and promoting regulatory transparency.  In 2009, U.S. goods exports to Israel declined by 36 percent to $9.3 billion, while U.S. imports from Israel decreased 18 percent to $18.3 billion. 


Jordan
Free Trade Agreement


In 2009, the United States and Jordan continued to benefit from their extensive economic partnership.  A key element of this relationship is the United States-Jordan Free Trade Agreement, which was fully implemented on January 1, 2010.  In addition, the Qualifying Industrial Zones (QIZs), established by Congress in 1996, allow products to enter the United States duty-free if manufactured in Israel, Jordan, Egypt, or the West Bank and Gaza.  The program has succeeded in stimulating significant business cooperation between Jordan and Israel.

Korea
Free Trade Agreement - Pending US Congressional Approval


The United States and the Republic of Korea successfully concluded the negotiation of a free trade agreement on April 1, 2007, and signed the United States-Korea Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA), on June 30, 2007. 

The Administration believes this FTA has the potential to bring significant economic and strategic benefits for the United States and is committed to working together with Korea to move the KORUS FTA forward. This will involve working through a number of outstanding issues, particularly related to automobiles and beef. 

In 2009, the United States Government initiated a thorough review of the FTA and is consulting closely with Congress and U.S. stakeholders to identify the most effective approaches for dealing with these concerns. 


Morocco
Free Trade Agreement


The United States and Morocco signed an FTA on June 15, 2004.  The Agreement entered into force on January 1, 2006.  The United States-Morocco FTA is a comprehensive agreement that is an important part of the effort to promote a more open and prosperous society.  The FTA supports the significant economic and political reforms that are underway in Morocco and provides for improved commercial and market opportunities for U.S. exports to Morocco by reducing and eliminating trade barriers.  

Since the entry into force of the FTA, the U.S. goods trade surplus with Morocco has risen to $1.2 billion in 2009, up from $79 million in 2005 (the year prior to entry into force).  U.S. goods exports in 2009 were $1.6 billion, up 12 percent from the previous year.  Corresponding U.S. imports from Morocco were $461 million, down 48 percent.  Morocco is now the 62nd largest export market for U.S. goods.


North American - Free Trade Agreement
Canada
Mexico


On January 1, 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico (NAFTA) entered into force.  All remaining duties and quantitative restrictions were eliminated, as scheduled, on January 1, 2008.  NAFTA created the world’s largest free trade area, which now links 449 million people producing over $16 trillion worth of goods and services. 

Trade between the United States and its NAFTA partners has soared since the agreement entered into force. U.S. two-way trade with Canada and Mexico exceeds U.S. trade with the European Union and Japan combined.  U.S. goods exports to NAFTA partners have more than doubled between 1993 and 2009, from $142 billion to $325 billion.


Oman
Free Trade Agreement


The United States-Oman FTA, which entered into force on January 1, 2009, builds on existing FTAs to promote economic reform and openness.  Implementation of the obligations contained in the comprehensive agreement will generate export opportunities for U.S. goods and services providers, solidify Oman’s trade and investment liberalization, and strengthen intellectual property rights protection and enforcement. 


Panama
Free Trade Agreement - Pending US Congressional Approval


The United States and Panama signed a trade promotion agreement, sometimes called a Free Trade Agreement (FTA), on June 28, 2007. Panama approved the TPA on July 11, 2007. The United States has not yet approved the TPA.

U.S.-Panama FTA is a comprehensive free trade agreement that can result in significant liberalization of trade in goods and services, including financial services. It also includes important disciplines relating to customs administration and trade facilitation, technical barriers to trade, government procurement, investment, telecommunications, electronic commerce, intellectual property rights, and labor and environmental protection.


Peru
Free Trade Agreement


The United States and Peru signed the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (PTPA) on April 12, 2006.  The Peruvian Congress ratified the Agreement in June 2006 and a Protocol of Amendment in June 2007. On December 14, 2007, the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act became law, and the PTPA entered into force on February 1, 2009.

The United States’ two-way trade with Peru was $8.8 billion in 2009, with U.S. goods exports to Peru at $4.8 billion.

Singapore
Free Trade Agreement


The United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement has been in force since January 1, 2004.  U.S. two-way goods trade totaled $37 billion in 209, up 17 percent from 2003 (the year before the FTA’s entry into force). U.S. goods exports were $21.6 billion, up 31 percent from 2003, and U.S. goods imports were $15.4 billion, up 2 percent from 2003.



  2012 3rd International Conference on Environmental Science and Development (ICESD 2012)